A dialogue between Do-Justice and Professing Christian
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A dialogue between Do-Justice and Professing Christian dedicated to the respective and collective abolition societies, and to all other benovelent, humane philanthropists in America

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Published by Printed by Peter Brynberg for the author in Wilmington [Del.] .
Written in

Subjects:

  • Slavery -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Freeborn Garrettson.
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 25495.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination58 p.
Number of Pages58
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17712136M

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A dialogue between Do-Justice and Professing Christian. Dedicated to the respective and collective abolition societies, and to all other benovelent, humane philanthropists, in America. A dialogue between Do-Justice and Professing Christian.: Dedicated to the respective and collective abolition societies, and to all other benovelent, humane philanthropists, in America. Get this from a library! A dialogue between Do-Justice and Professing Christian: dedicated to the respective and collective abolition societies, and to all other benovelent, humane philanthropists in America. [Freeborn Garrettson]. Read Christian articles, Christian poems, Christian Bible studies, Christian devotional and Christian books by Christian writers. We also offer free use Christian articles for Christian publishers, Christian non-fiction and Christian fiction. We offer Christian author training, Christian writer training, Christian writing contests and a Christian writing challenge.

It is not new to argue that the dialogue form that began in classical Greece ended with the rise of Christianity. We find the idea inherent, for instance, in the standard work on the classical dialogue by Rudolf Hirzel, published in , [] though Hirzel devotes little actual space to considering the Christian, or indeed the late antique, period.. Goldhill’s argument ignores the later.   Encouraging Christians to call for public policies that benefit those most vulnerable in our nation, To Do Justice offers tools for studying complex domestic social problems such as Social Security, immigration, the environment, and public education, and serves as a guidebook to becoming involved in social in Christian tradition, each essay analyzes a 5/5(2). tract titled, A Dialogue Between Do-Justice and Professing-Christian. The tract was designed to convince slaveholders who have not questioned the institution of slavery and offers practical advice to them on how to become extricated from the system. The Dialogue is an allegory modeled after John Bunyan's classic work, The Pilgrim's Progress. Kateregga, Bardu D., Shenk, David, W. A Muslim And A Christian In Dialogue. Scottsdale, PA: Herald Press, In this book, Katereggea and Shenk, from the beginning of the book to the end, argue for the commonalities between God/Allah. As a result, they find similarities and some contrasts between Islam and Christianity/5(7).

Freeborn Garrettson has written: 'American Methodist pioneer' -- subject(s): Clergy, Diaries, Methodist Episcopal Church, Pioneers 'A dialogue between Do . Freeborn Garrettson spoke for many when he wrote in his book “A Dialogue between Do-Justice and Professing Christian” that slavery was contrary to the gospel and to natural law. A person must “do justice” according to both the biblical worldview and according to the. Kateregga, Bardu D., Shenk, David, W. A Muslim And A Christian In Dialogue. Scottsdale, PA: Herald Press, In this book, Katereggea and Shenk, from the beginning of the book to the end, argue for the commonalities between God/Allah. As a result, they find similarities and some contrasts between Islam and Christianity/5(4). Visit the Centre for Public Dialogue website. Do Justice is a conversation starter for justice in the Christian Reformed Church. Together we're finding new ideas and perspectives, sharing better ways to engage in justice work, remembering our motivation, and growing our faith.